Eq: Large Cap

(New York)

Income is both extremely desired, and very hard to achieve in today’s market. Based on the economic data which hit the morning of the 7th, it seems likely to stay that way. So where are the best places to find income? One of the first places investors think of outside of bonds is the dividend aristocrats, but the bad news is they are only yielding 1.9%. If you need more income, check out high yield bond ETFs like the SPDR Bloomberg Barclays High-Yield Bond ETF (JNK), which yields 4%. But the best bet is to look at bond closed end funds, for example the DoubleLine Income Solutions Fund run by bond legend Jeffrey Gundlach. The fund yields 7.3%.


FINSUM: Bond closed end funds are great. Many trade at a discount to their NAV and they have very nice yields.

(New York)

Income is scarce and investors need it more than ever (funny how that happens). Bonds look very risky given the direction of rates. So where can investors turn? Take a look at three different asset classes: blue-chip REITs, preferred shares, and property-backed loans. Blue-chip REITs can be a good investment because they have high yields (e.g. 4%+), but are still quality companies. They are also often trading at a discount because of the pandemic. Check out ticker “0”, Realty Income. Private property loans are another good option, yielding 8-12% , and often having good LTVs of around 60%, which means you have some significant downside protection.


FINSUM: These are some good alternative income options. Our personal favorite are the REITs because of their liquidity, but private property loans are a good option too, especially given the new economic cycle.

(New York)

There has been a lot going on in the SPAC world, and high yield bonds have been very active lately given the rate environment too. But from a casual glance it would be hard to see that the two have much impact on one another. Yet, as it happens, SPACs are helping strengthen the high-yield bond market. According to the Wall Street Journal, “The wave of cash raised by special-purpose acquisition companies is rolling into the junk debt market, aiding distressed companies and rewarding investors who own their bonds and loans … SPACs, also known as blank-check companies, have issued roughly $100 billion of stock this year, a record, to buy private companies and take them public. Some SPACs are targeting companies with below-investment-grade credit ratings, hoping to use their cash piles to pay down debt and grow the businesses”.


FINSUM: When there is that much money in search of targets, it makes perfect sense that the search would extend into the high yield market.

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