Eq: Large Cap

(New York)

Quantitative ETFs are growing in popularity. Using rules-based approaches to stock-picking is cost effective and has proven successful in many cases, making quantitative methods a good fit for ETFs. With that in mind, here are seven of the best quantitative ETFs: QuantX Dynamic Beta US Equity ETF (XUSA, 0.59% fee), Hull Tactical US ETF (HTUS, 0.92% fee), Cambria Global Momentum ETF (GMOM, 1.03% fee), U.S. Quantitative Value ETF (QVAL, 0.49% fee), IQ Chaikin U.S. Small Cap ETF (CSML, 0.35% fee), Vesper US Large Cap Short-Term Reversal Strategy ETF (UTRN, 0.75%), and the SPDR MFS Systematic Growth Equity ETF (SYG, 0.61% fee).


FINSUM: CSML was the most interesting of the group for us, as we think there is more alpha to be had in small caps with these sorts of approaches. We also ran this story in case anyone has clients who have been asking for more quant funds.

(New York)

As our readers will know, we spent the better part of last week at the Inside ETFs conference. As part of our time there, we are planning to feature a couple of ETFs which we think might be interesting to advisors. The first one we want to feature is a special fund from Legg Mason, the fund is called the Legg Mason Low Volatility High Dividend ETF (LVHD). We were lucky enough to meet with one of the fund’s specialists, Josh Greco, at the conference, and his passion for the fund’s approach really shined through. The fund’s own words describe it best, it seeks to track “the investment results of an underlying index composed of equity securities of U.S. companies with relatively high yield and low price and earnings volatility … LVHD may benefit investors who want income but are concerned about the volatility that can come from traditional equity income investments”. Basically, the idea is to get yield and upside, without so much of the volatility that is traditionally associated with equities. Mr. Greco contextualized the utility of the approach succinctly and convincingly, explaining that as clients’ lives elongate they are going to need to stay in equities longer to get capital appreciation. Accordingly, this fund seeks to de-risk some of that necessary exposure while still giving significant upside and yield. The fund has about $600m in AUM, is widely available, has an expense ratio of 0.27%, and a dividend yield of 3.48%.


FINSUM: In our mind, this fund does an excellent job of fusing some of the best elements of fixed income (yields and less volatility) with the best part of stocks (capital appreciation). It may be a great fit for older clients that need to keep a significant allocation to equities. It is also quite affordable at 0.27%.

(New York)

High yield had a very bleak run to finish 2018. The asset class went over 40 days without a single sale as the junk credit market seized up. However, it has made a comeback in a major way. The first five weeks of 2019 saw a staggering 5.25% gain in the Bloomberg Barclays US Corporate High Yield Index. New issues were quite oversubscribed (more than double), and the general mood has completely shifted.


FINSUM: The Fed backing off on rates sure makes a difference! It is interesting the market reacted this sharply given that high yield is relatively more insulated from rates. In our view, the turnaround is largely a relief rally that the Fed won’t push the economy into a recession.

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