Markets

(New York)

Markets were up big today on news out of China. The day started with Chinese stocks surging on news from the government—Chinese state media told its people that they should load up on stocks. This sent hopes for a recovery soaring around the global and markets rose strongly. Beyond the state’s endorsement, the Chinese economy does seem to be dong well. “In recent weeks the data has looked very positive from China. Its economy is back in motion, and that should lift global equities a bit”, summarized Principal Global Investors chief strategist, Seema Shah.


FINSUM: The state media announcement seems a bit hollow, but since real economic data in China appears to be improving, the overall direction looks positive.

(New York)

There is alarm growing among muni bond investors as credit quality continues to deteriorate. During COVID there has been a widening gap in pension deficits among municipalities, and investors are keeping a close eye because it is leading to deferred pension payments. This is troubling for a number of reasons. Firstly, it digs municipalities into a bigger hole because they must pay interest on deferred payments; and secondly, it spooks bond markets and makes it harder for them to access liquidity. In other words, deferred pension payments, such as the nearly $1 bn one New Jersey elected to do in May, dig muni issuers into a deeper and deeper hole.


FINSUM: Pension recipients are very likely to be considered senior to bondholders, so this is a very alarming situation for investors.

(New York)

One of the best ways to watch the damage to the economy is to monitor the performance of consumer debt. Auto loans, student loans and beyond give a clear indicator of the health of American finances. Right now, the data is looking bad, reinforcing why this might be a long and difficult recovery. According to the WSJ, “Americans have skipped payments on more than 100 million student loans, auto loans and other forms of debt since the coronavirus hit the U.S … The largest increase occurred for student loans, with 79 million accounts in deferment or other relief status, up from 18 million a month earlier. Auto loans in some type of deferment doubled to 7.3 million accounts.  Personal loans in deferment doubled to 1.3 million accounts.” The total of deferments is triple the number from the end of April. Lenders, who have generally been accommodative to this point with borrowers, expect delinquency to soar later this year.


FINSUM: You cannot have 50m people—roughly a third of the US workforce—lose their jobs and not have any repercussions. This is the kind of data that makes stock indexes look rather ludicrous right now.

Page 1 of 37

Contact Us

Newsletter

Subscribe

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…