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Investors are shucking aside overpriced, actively managed funds and sinking money instead in less expense index ETFs, said Dave Nadig, financial futurist at research and consulting firm Vetta Fi., according to thinkadvisor.com.

 

Strong inflows have culminated from ETFs highlighted by dividend strategies, munis and high yield bonds, he continued.

 

Among most active investors, ETFs have emerged as the go to vehicle, Nadig continued. On top of that, for most investors, they’ve evolving into the default choice.

 

This year – in the eye of the worst worse financial markets in decades – the country’s $6.6 trillion ETF generated $375 billion in net inflows. And it’s been share and share alike as the wealth is spreading across the board. For example, positive inflows into equities, currencies and alternatives has reached into the billions of dollars, the site reported Nadig pointing out. 

 

“It’s been one of the circumstances where the entire ETF universe has caught a bid,” Nadig said.

 

A Fitch Ratings reports shows the likelihood that U.S. investors will continue to rachet up their fixed income exchange traded fund holdings, according to pioline.com.

 

On the heels of new guidelines kicking in in the Big Apple last December, Fitch indicated its rated 10 such ETFs. Doing so has helped ease the way for investors to maintain shares of them.

Fidelity Investments is expanding its alternative offerings with a new private credit fund. According to Ignites, the company registered the Fidelity Private Credit Fund as a ‘40-Act fund structured as a perpetual-term business development company. The fund will be managed by Fidelity Diversifying Solutions, the company’s new alternative unit. The fund, which will focus on lending to smaller firms, is looking to raise between $100 million and $1 billion initially. The fund will allow investors who don’t necessarily meet the requirements needed to invest in private equity, venture capital, or hedge funds. However, it does require them to have a gross income of $70,000 per year or a net worth of $250,000. According to the fund’s prospectus, net fees for the fund will range from 4.89% for institutional shares to 5.74% for S-class shares. It will also have a performance fee of 12.5% each quarter exceeding 5% growth and 12.5% of cumulative realized capital gains from inception through each calendar year.



Finsum:Fidelity is expected to launch a new private credit fund for investors who typically don’t meet the requirements needed to invest in private equity or hedge funds.

A manager at Artemis believes now is the perfect time to consider active fixed income solutions. Grace Le, who co-manages the Artemis Corporate Bond Fund, told Financial Times that an active bond manager’s job is to protect their clients during uncertain times and that is exactly what we are experiencing now. She believes that the reversal of quantitative easing led to more volatility in bond markets, resulting in a “boon for active investors.” Investors are dealing with inflation, macroeconomic uncertainty, and the potential for a recession. Muzinich & Co's co-head of public markets Michael McEachern told the publication that active managers can invest in shorter-duration bonds less impacted by increasing rates and rotate into higher-quality credit that is less sensitive to the current environment. Managers can also avoid concentration in a portfolio and deploy carry trades, which means borrowing at a low-interest rate and investing in an asset that provides a higher return.


Finsum:According to two bond fund managers,investors should consider active fixed income in times of economic and market uncertainty. 

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