Displaying items by tag: Goldman Sachs

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 09:14

Goldman Warns of Big New Risk to Stocks

(New York)

There is a big new risk to stocks to worry about, says Goldman Sachs. Actually, it is a not a new risk, it is an old one that investors have not been thinking about. The risk? Pay. The bank says that rising pay pressure from workers could hurt companies at all levels and eat into margins. The labor market is incredibly tight, which puts upward pressure on pay and downward pressure on corporate margins. Wage growth is already at its highest rate since 2007, and companies may feel the sting. According to Goldman, “While S&P 500 profit margins are at historical highs, survey data indicates a record level of corporate concern regarding labor costs”.


FINSUM: Many analysts have been predicting an earnings recession and this is one of the factors that could exacerbate it.

Published in Eq: Total Market
Monday, 01 July 2019 09:43

A Great New Safety Stock?

(New York)

With markets at elevated levels, investors may be looking for a safety stock. How about one outside the usual suspects? Here is a suggestion—Goldman Sachs. Yes, we know, that sounds odd considering that investment banks tend to have wildly unpredictable earnings because of fluctuations in trading revenue. However, the bank has just made a big dividend boost from 85 cents to $1.25 per share, which is likely to significantly elevate its status with dividend-seeking investors. Goldman is also diversifying away from its highest risk businesses and smoothing out its revenue by focusing on a more steady Main Street-oriented suite of products.


FINSUM: We think the jury is still out on Goldman’s success at retail banking products. That said, the prevailing narrative about its transformation and the dividend boost will help it be less volatile.

Published in Eq: Financials

(Washington)

It is getting to be the time of year when everyone is trying to predict next year’s election. A lot of polls show Trump is trailing, which has given Democrats hope and some comfort. However, a new chart published by Goldman Sachs offers a different view. The bank analyzed historical approval ratings against economic data heading into elections and found that when the economy is healthy, that factor outweighs approval rating. Goldman concluded that should the economy stay on decent footing, Trump has a clear path to victory.


FINSUM: This makes a lot of sense to us and we think it offers a more realistic picture than more minutely-focused opinion polls.

Published in Politics
Friday, 14 June 2019 10:20

Goldman Says to Buy This Stock

(New York)

You might not think it is the right time for this stock, but Goldman Sachs says you should. The bank has just come out very positive on Ford. The automotive company has far outpaced the S&P 500 this year, but is still down 16% over the last 12 months. Goldman says that Wall Street is not appreciating how significant Ford’s recent restructuring is, as they think it can unlock “billions in trapped value” by lowering costs in the trucks division.


FINSUM: Basically, Goldman says Ford is going to see a big and sustained pop in earnings that no one sees coming. It is a nice, simple thesis and we like it.

Published in Eq: Value
Thursday, 06 June 2019 07:57

Goldman Says to Not Bank on Rate Cuts

(New York)

The market is overly reliant on a rate cut, say UBS and Goldman Sachs. Both banks think investors are banking too strongly on the Fed cutting rates. The market is currently forecasting three 25 bp rate cuts by the end of the year. Treasury markets have surged, but too far says Goldman. UBS believes “Markets now imply that the Fed will cut rates by around 70 basis points this year and 35 bps next year. We find this excessive … We believe it would take a recession to provoke the magnitude of rate cuts currently being priced by the market, and this remains unlikely in our view”.


FINSUM: We do not believe the Fed will cut rates this sharply unless there is a recession, but maybe that is exactly what markets are expecting (just look at the yield curve).

Published in Bonds: Treasuries
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