BondBloxx Investment Management recently announced the launch of eight duration-specific U.S. Treasury ETFs. The funds, which trade on the NYSE Arca, offer investors a more precise, lower-cost way to get exposure to U.S. Treasury Securities. The ETFs track a series of indices developed by Bloomberg Index Services that include duration-constrained subsets of U.S. Treasury bonds with over $300 billion outstanding. The funds add to BondBloxx’s existing eleven products launched this year, including seven industry sector-specific high yield bond ETFs, three ratings-specific high yield bond ETFs, and one short-duration emerging market bond ETF. The new ETFs include the BondBloxx Bloomberg Six Month Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XHLF), the BondBloxx Bloomberg One Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XONE), the BondBloxx Bloomberg Two Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XTWO), the BondBloxx Bloomberg Three Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XTRE), the BondBloxx Bloomberg Five Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XFIV), the BondBloxx Bloomberg Seven Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XSVN), the BondBloxx Bloomberg Ten Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XTEN), and the BondBloxx Bloomberg Twenty Year Target Duration US Treasury ETF (XTWY).


Finsum:BondBloxx adds to its existing suite of ETFs with eight duration-specific U.S. Treasury ETFs giving investors lower cost exposure to U.S. Treasury Securities.

Investors are shucking aside overpriced, actively managed funds and sinking money instead in less expense index ETFs, said Dave Nadig, financial futurist at research and consulting firm Vetta Fi., according to thinkadvisor.com.

 

Strong inflows have culminated from ETFs highlighted by dividend strategies, munis and high yield bonds, he continued.

 

Among most active investors, ETFs have emerged as the go to vehicle, Nadig continued. On top of that, for most investors, they’ve evolving into the default choice.

 

This year – in the eye of the worst worse financial markets in decades – the country’s $6.6 trillion ETF generated $375 billion in net inflows. And it’s been share and share alike as the wealth is spreading across the board. For example, positive inflows into equities, currencies and alternatives has reached into the billions of dollars, the site reported Nadig pointing out. 

 

“It’s been one of the circumstances where the entire ETF universe has caught a bid,” Nadig said.

 

A Fitch Ratings reports shows the likelihood that U.S. investors will continue to rachet up their fixed income exchange traded fund holdings, according to pioline.com.

 

On the heels of new guidelines kicking in in the Big Apple last December, Fitch indicated its rated 10 such ETFs. Doing so has helped ease the way for investors to maintain shares of them.

Fidelity Investments is expanding its alternative offerings with a new private credit fund. According to Ignites, the company registered the Fidelity Private Credit Fund as a ‘40-Act fund structured as a perpetual-term business development company. The fund will be managed by Fidelity Diversifying Solutions, the company’s new alternative unit. The fund, which will focus on lending to smaller firms, is looking to raise between $100 million and $1 billion initially. The fund will allow investors who don’t necessarily meet the requirements needed to invest in private equity, venture capital, or hedge funds. However, it does require them to have a gross income of $70,000 per year or a net worth of $250,000. According to the fund’s prospectus, net fees for the fund will range from 4.89% for institutional shares to 5.74% for S-class shares. It will also have a performance fee of 12.5% each quarter exceeding 5% growth and 12.5% of cumulative realized capital gains from inception through each calendar year.



Finsum:Fidelity is expected to launch a new private credit fund for investors who typically don’t meet the requirements needed to invest in private equity or hedge funds.

A manager at Artemis believes now is the perfect time to consider active fixed income solutions. Grace Le, who co-manages the Artemis Corporate Bond Fund, told Financial Times that an active bond manager’s job is to protect their clients during uncertain times and that is exactly what we are experiencing now. She believes that the reversal of quantitative easing led to more volatility in bond markets, resulting in a “boon for active investors.” Investors are dealing with inflation, macroeconomic uncertainty, and the potential for a recession. Muzinich & Co's co-head of public markets Michael McEachern told the publication that active managers can invest in shorter-duration bonds less impacted by increasing rates and rotate into higher-quality credit that is less sensitive to the current environment. Managers can also avoid concentration in a portfolio and deploy carry trades, which means borrowing at a low-interest rate and investing in an asset that provides a higher return.


Finsum:According to two bond fund managers,investors should consider active fixed income in times of economic and market uncertainty. 

NEOS Investments, an investment firm specializing in options-based income solutions, launched three actively managed ETFs this week, including two fixed income ETFs designed to help advisors and investors navigate the current market environment. The NEOS Enhanced Income Aggregate Bond ETF (BNDI) generates monthly income from investing in a representative portfolio of the U.S. Aggregate Bond Market and implementing a data-driven put option strategy. The NEOS Enhanced Income Cash Alternative ETF (CSHI) generates monthly income from investing in a portfolio of 1–3-month Treasury Bills and implementing a data-driven put option strategy. Both ETFs, which now trade on the NYSE, utilize a put spread approach that involves selling short puts and buying long puts to generate option premiums to be distributed as income without taking on outsized risk.


Finsum:Options-based investmentfirmNEOSrecently launched two fixed income ETFsoffering investors a novel approach to monthly income.

Touchstone Investments, which is known for its Distinctively Active® funds, recently announced the launch of its fourth actively managed ETF, the Touchstone Ultra Short Income ETF (TUSI). The fund, which started trading on the Cboe BZX, seeks maximum total return consistent with the preservation of capital by primarily investing in a diversified portfolio of investment grade fixed income securities. Its portfolio is managed to maintain an effective duration of one year or less under normal market conditions. Managers for TUSI buy fixed-income securities believed to be attractively priced relative to the market or similar securities. The launch follows three actively managed ETFs launched during the summer including the Touchstone Strategic Income Opportunities ETF (SIO), the Touchstone US Large Cap Focused ETF (BZX), and the Touchstone Dividend Select ETF (DVND). Each ETF has a corresponding mutual fund that shares a similar investment strategy. All four ETFs are sub-advised by Fort Washington Investment Advisors. 


Finsum:Touchstone Investments recently launched the Touchstone Ultra Short Income ETF, its fourth actively managed ETF launch this summer.

According to Refinitiv Lipper’s fund flows, fixed income ETFs saw a net $4.5 billion in weekly outflows for the week ending on August 24th, 2022. This marked the group’s first weekly outflows in nine weeks. This also corresponded with bond ETF’s third straight week of average negative returns. The bond types with the largest outflows included corporate high yield ETFs with $3.0 billion in outflows, corporate investment grade ETFs with $733 million in outflows, and government Treasury ETFs with $570 million in weekly outflows. Corporate high yield ETFs had their eighth largest weekly outflows to date, while corporate investment grade ETFs saw their first week of outflows in eight weeks. However, not all fixed-income ETFs saw outflows. International & global debt ETFs saw $101 million in inflows and government mortgage ETFs saw $15 million in weekly inflows. Those were the only two fixed-income groups to report inflows.


Finsum:With fixed income ETFs seeing their third straight week of negative average returns, bond ETFs see their first outflows in nine weeks. 

Like easy? Launched earlier in the month, sole and institutional investors will experience an easier process to trade the most current benchmark U.S. Treasuries thanks to a new series of exchanged traded funds, according to reuters.com. It sheds on the maturing ETFs within the fixed income terrain.

While treasuries, of course, are among the bevy of the world’s most liquid securities, particularly for investors who need to frequently roll them over to sustain the maturity, trading them can be plodding.

"This gives (investors) a tool to say, we really want to focus on how we execute our investment strategy, as opposed to how effectively we trade Treasury bonds," said F/m President Alex Morris.

 

The new ETFs, which will eventually include more maturities, as well as options, will make it easier for people managing bond portfolios in a precise way, said Dave Nadig, director of research at ETF Flows.

"I put this in the category of sharp tools in the drawer," he said. "For most investors, I don't think it's relevant. For investors that need this product, it's a godsend."

 

Meantime, it’s largely been coming up roses for fixed income ETFs. Their ranks have swelled, piquing the interest of fresh investors, according to thestreet.com.

 

And talk about a high ceiling. Last month, the ETF industry hit a worldwide high of $862 billion in assets under management, shattering records. As of July 31 in this country, 706 ETFs from 22 providers drew $582 billion.

 

 

U.S. Treasury yields rose on Monday with the benchmark 10-year yield hitting a five-week peak of 3.039%, while the 30-year yield climbed to a seven-week high of 3.268%. Yields rose as investors await a Federal Reserve gathering occurring later this week in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The Fed is widely expected to reinforce its commitment to tackling inflation. Fed Chair Jerome Powell is scheduled to speak Friday morning at the Jackson Hole symposium. Last week's Fed minutes appeared to suggest that the Fed is on course to continue to increase interest rates with the central bank seeing "little evidence" that inflation was easing. The auction for shorter-dated coupons this week also added to the sell-off in Treasuries, pushing their yields higher. Traders typically sell Treasuries before an auction and then buy them back at a lower price. 


Finsum: Treasuries hit multi-week highs on Monday as investors await Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s speech on Friday morning at the Jackson Hole symposium.

BlackRock launched a new series of fixed-income ETFs which allow access to buy-write investments on bond securities. iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond BuyWrite Strategy (TLTW), Shares High Yield Corporate Bond BuyWrite Strategy ETF (HYGW), and the iShares Investment Grade Corporate Bond BuyWrite Strategy ETF (Cboe: LQDW) are all different variations of the new options available to investors. BR says buy-write strategies have been available to equity ETFs for a long time, but have not infiltrated fixed income. These options will give more exposure to yield in what has been one of the most difficult times for fixed-income investment in decades. This just adds to BR’s legacy of innovation and creativity in bond market ETFs.


Finsum: This is an interesting idea, and maybe if inflation is cooling quicker than expected bonds are too cheap. 

 

Fixed Income ETF: Bonds, Total Market, ETF, Treasuries

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