Displaying items by tag: spreads

(New York)

The yield curve has been injecting fear into markets all year. Investors understandably panicked when the spreads between short-term and long-term Treasuries bonds inverted a few weeks ago. However, investors have been looking at the yield curve with the wrong lens, argues Barron’s. If you actually pay attention to what has been happening recently, you will see a distinct picture of spreads rising, which is a very bullish indicator. Moving averages on the spreads have been growing, the first instance of such in a long time. A number of macro factors are supportive of wider spreads, including a now dovish Fed and strongly rising oil prices, which have injected more fear of inflation.


FINSUM: We think spreads are headed in the right direction. Taken as a whole, the market is starting to look like a good buying opportunity right now. It seems odd to say given stocks are at an all-time high, but if you look at the back drop, the situation looks pretty bullish.

Published in Bonds: Treasuries
Thursday, 25 April 2019 11:43

Why a Muni Bond Collapse is Brewing

(New York)

Investors beware, the muni bond market has gone through some dramatic moves over the last year, and the market looks like it might be headed for a downturn. Changes to the US’ tax policy have caused massive inflows to muni bonds as investors try to minimize their taxes. This has caused yields to plunge and spreads to Treasuries to widen. The average ten-year muni yield is now just 1.965% versus 2.6% in 10-year Treasuries, the widest gap since at least 2009. Munis in high tax states have plunged even further, with a recent California issuance having a yield of just 1.73%. One portfolio manager warns investors that they need to be responsive, saying “The best place for investors to be is shorter duration, higher-quality credit, so when opportunities present themselves, they have the flexibility to take them … You can’t really set it and forget it”.


FINSUM: This is a hard situation to call. On the one hand, the rapid fall in yields is worrying and the market seems overbought, but on the other hand, you have somewhat artificial demand being created by the government, which makes the behavior less risky and more sustainable in our view.

Published in Bonds: Munis
Tuesday, 16 April 2019 13:03

Why it is Time to Steer Clear of Junk

(New York)

One of the odd things about the recession fears since December is that spreads on junk bonds have not risen. Usually, junk bonds sell-off when there are recession fears, as they are the riskiest credits and likely to suffer the worst downturns. However, the opposite has happened in junk, with spreads to investment grade very tight. In fact, investors are picking up so little extra yield in junk bonds, that in many cases they are not even worth the risk. Spreads are tied for their narrowest since the Financial Crisis at just 60 basis points.


FINSUM: The last time spreads got this tight was last October, right before the market tanked. Warning sign.

Published in Bonds: High Yield
Wednesday, 27 March 2019 12:07

What Corporate Bonds Say About a Recession

(New York)

The general understanding of markets is that bond investors are signaling that there is going to be a recession. Treasury yields have tumbled, and the Treasury yield curve has inverted, both signs of a coming downturn. However, the corporate bond market is sending a different signal, and it is worth paying attention to. The big sign of economic worry in the corporate bond markets is widening spreads between investment grade bonds and junk, but that is exactly the opposite of what is happening. The market is sanguine, and showing little of the concern that Treasury markets are. “Corporate spreads are extraordinarily narrow”, says Dan Fuss, vice chairman of Loomis Sayles.


FINSUM: This is a very good sign in our opinion. While it could turn out to be wrong, we do think this signals that Treasury investors may simply be overreacting.

Published in Bonds: IG
Friday, 28 December 2018 12:49

Investors are Fleeing Corporate Debt

(New York)

While the stock market is getting all of the attention, the bond market is experiencing a lot of turbulence as well. The riskiest corners of the debt market, including junk bonds and loans, are on pace for their worst month since the US downgrade in August 2011. High yield’s spread to Treasuries has surged a whopping 110 basis points since the start of the month, and unlike in stocks, there aren’t signs of a rebound. The average yield on the index is 8%.


FINSUM: It is reasonable to be nervous about credit right now given the huge volume of issuance in recent years and the pending threat of a recession and accompanying earnings slowdown.

Published in Bonds: High Yield
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